Forge of Empires: Best strategy game for iPad

August 3, 2014

At last there is a strategy game for iPad.  Forge of Empires.  Nothing else I’ve tried really compares.  And like everything else on iPad it has forced me into a wider community and to my surprise I like it.

Since Christmas, 1992, when my son first tempted me to make a move in Sid Mier’s Civilization, I have been a rabid fan of computer strategy games.  And I have enjoyed all of the variations since.  Some of today’s mods are just amazing and make it an entirely different game.

Once, in between speaking engagements in Asia, I was sent to the South Pacific island resort of Bali.  The company put me in a five star hotel-resort.  When I opened my sliding doors, cool winds blew in off the ocean.  I spent the week taking food in my room and battling the demons in the computer.  Who needs a beach when you have the whole world to conquer?

But try as it may, Sid Mier’s Civilization has not yet made the transition to iPad that I want.  And I grow tired dragging around a heavy computer.

Forge of Empires was a perfect fit for iPad.  The basics of the game are simple enough to work and yet the options are endless.  The first few weeks I was totally on iPad and only reluctantly checked out the extra features by going online with my desktop.

The best part is that you can play a game and be part of the family.  I am no longer in “the computer room.”  I can be right there on the couch watching a movie or at Panera Bread or Starbucks, while managing my growing empire.  And how can the family complain if they are checking their Facebook or pictures on Instagram?

Now don’t just rush to your iPad and download the app.  Go to your desktop and put in the url below.  Just cut and paste.  Or go to this link. It will sign you up as my friend and I will be able to give you some supplies or even coach you if you need or want it.  For this is a game where allies can be of help.

http://us.forgeofempires.com/?invitor_id=1898927&world_id=us2&ref=player_invite_link

There is war, there is economy, there is city building and long range planning.  And it can all be carried around with your iPad.

Nice.


Regina Noriega and “the era of women.”

January 30, 2014

Listening to the audio version of Ayn Rand’s classic bestseller, Atlas Shrugged, I was reminded of Regina Noriega.  She is the most recent sensation in a growing list of outstanding women in the field of direct sales.

This was the one field that men seemed to have to themselves, Mary Kay Ash being the anomaly.   Increasingly, in politics, journalism, education and business, women are doing the work.  Hillary Clinton appears on this week’s TIME magazine cover crushing a little man beneath her heel.  By the way, the new editor of TIME is Nancy Gibbs, a new star in her own right.  More and more, men are increasingly being seen as having only one exclusive function, namely, protecting women from other men.

Regina Noriega has built a career creating brands and, well, networking, building genuine relationships with people in the field of direct sales and network marketing.

Regina’s tenacity, drive, vibrancy and ability to be a leader is known and greatly admired in the industry. Everyone that’s worked with her on any level knows her standards are high to the level of perfectionism and that she expects everyone around her to operate on the same level. Mediocrity in any form is not an option.

Again, to use the Atlas Shrugged metaphor, she’s never taken the easy road.  Rather than ride the train, she thrives on building tracks and at the same time she’s comfortable swimming against the rip tide and can turn from defense to offense on a dime. Strategic is a word that describes her leadership skills.

Having spent 40 years as an amateur historian of the whole network marketing industry I’ve watched her face many professional challenges and tackle them with leadership skills that display not only strength but grace and courage. Her negotiation skills and work ethic is famous.  And always, she practices the golden rule.  (No, not that one, the real one.)

She’s usually the only woman, and minority woman at that, seated in the boardroom. She’s highly respected for her strategic mind and treats all around her with complete frankness, always thinking about the goals of a team above everything else. She talks hard and direct but always makes everyone feel like they are always in it together. She makes you want to drive yourself hard not only for yourself but for her. The best thing about her is that she is passionate about  helping people first and joining people in their personal development journeys.

I’m not sure where she is headed.  Will she take the route other woman business stars have taken and enter public life?  Will she be another Meg Whitman?  As a corporate executive she is legend.  So there is always that. And she is one of the rare corporate animals in network marketing who would thrive in the field.  Not many in that category.  It would be fun to watch for woman are increasingly proving the misogynist, American, MLM old fogies that they can build groups bigger and better than they.  Look at Natasha Yena in the Ukraine.

Which brings us back to the dilemma I first posed.  What does this all mean for men?  What will we do?  Fight wars you say.  But that work is increasingly falling on the shoulders of mechanical drones.  We may soon see women sitting before computer consoles in America and Asia, duking it out through surrogate metal hardware on the ground.  Yes, for that we may need little boys too, Ender Wiggins, who have quick eye hand coordination but even then we don’t need men.

In the  celebrated, famous, Greek democracy of antiquity, women could not vote.  They could not own property.  Their word was not accepted in a court of law.  They were not even counted in a government census.  Today, at least outside the Islamic world, they are emerging as a dominate force.  Their activism has changed education.  Their votes have changed world governments.  And they are in the process of changing business as well.  They are all over the ballrooms of Davos.  Oh yes, I forgot to mention banking and finance.  There is Janet Yellen, the new chairman of the Federal Reserve.

So here come  Regina Noriega, the bright new face in direct sales.  We should not be surprised.  She is yet another star in an ever expanding galaxy of women high achievers.


Duke Snider on steroids

January 26, 2014

It’s the end of baseball as we know it.  Stick a fork in it.  This month’s drama with Alex Rodriguez only underscores the futility of trying to make it work the way it once did.  If some use more drug enhancements and others less and still others none, and we only find out later in bits and pieces, then it has become more a game of deception and less a physical contest or a team sport.

       Old baseball, real baseball was a game of statistics.  Duke Snider could never have been on steroids.  In five consecutive years, averaging 500 or more at bats each year, he hit 42, 40, 42, 43 and 40 home runs respectively.  He was a left handed hitter in a lineup of right handed power that included Gil Hodges, Roy Campanella, Carl Furillo, and Jackie Robinson.  The Brooklyn Dodgers always batted Snider third in the lineup to make sure he got the most at bats possible for a power hitter.
       By the time the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles and finally built their stadium in Chavez Ravine they had become a pitching baseball team.  At one time they fielded a pitching rotation of five twenty game winners in a starting lineup, Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Tommy Johns, Claude Osteen and Don Sutton.
       Their lead home run hitter in 1966 was Ron Fairly who hit only 14.  I saw one of those rare events at Wrigley Field in Chicago.  Later that year, in the same park, I saw Sandy Koufax and Dick Ellsworth pitch nine innings of shutout ball.  Both men were lifted in the ninth inning and neither one got credit for the win.
       The large expanses of Chavez Ravine purposely allowed plenty of room behind the plate to catch pop ups.  Even the powerful Frank Howard, who was biologically engineered to hit home runs, only managed one big year with 31.  Later, when he got was traded to the Washington Senators and a friendlier ball park he would hit forty or more home runs three years in a row.
       After Duke Snider won the National League home run crown in 1956, it would take 98 years for another Dodger to do it again, when Adrian Beltre would hit 48 but by then the modern age of steroid in sports was upon us.  Beltre would hit only 19 home runs the next year and in sixteen seasons he would never hit 40 or more home runs again.
       In 2000 a talented Dodger outfielder named Shawn Green hit 24 home runs in 610 at bats.  The next year he hit 49 in 619 at bats.  It set all Dodger records.  It blew Duke Snider, who as a left hander in a power hitting right handed lineup in the tiny Ebbets Field where the right field grandstands were only 257 feet away, out of the water.  For one golden year, inexplicably, he accomplished what no other Dodger had done since their beginning in 1884.  No one looked at Green’s spectacular year too closely.  We didn’t want to know.  But it’s hard to talk about Shawn Green and Duke Snider in the same sentence.  Baseball statistics are now meaningless.  And baseball without statistics, well, it is not the same game.
       The game has changed.  No one had to wonder if Ron Fairly was on steroids.
        It’s not just the players that are on steroids.  It’s the game itself.  And it is driven by the fans.  I thought this steroid age would spell the end of baseball.  The crowds would stay home, the television audiences would diminish, but it hasn’t.  It has evolved into some new kind of creature. You don’t have to wait for hours to see the home run or even the triple play. The waiting is all done for you and the finished product is shown in brief, exciting snippets, the whole day of events in the major leagues reduced to one half hour segments of video augmented by commentary and commercials.
       Baseball has become like genetically altered food.  It still looks and tastes the same, even better, but there is something creepy about eating chicken that comes to restaurant in tubes of pink dough looking substances or eating corn that isn’t corn and eating ice cream that is.
       Most young boys no longer play the game, unless electronically.  But the ones who do are well trained and groomed to perfection in little leagues, graduating upward.  In some respects they are better, more polished players than the kids who fought their way up from the sandlots and the back yard games of earlier generations.  It is still fun. But it is not a game.  It is a career track. And the people who become the stars cheat to get there.
       So what do they get?  For a time, if they are really good at cheating, they get money, a few years of adulation.  Then comes condemnation and in some cases an early death.  What do we get? Like fast food, we get fast home runs.  We don’t have to wait.  Baseball is no longer the nation’s favorite pastime. It has become something different.

Jean-Luc Perrois “Talent finds a way”

August 22, 2013

Jean-Luc Perrois celebrates his birthday today and I wanted to get a little of his remarkable story on the record.  Perrois, my French brother in law, is a successful husband, father and businessman who lives in a beautiful chalet, high in the Alps overlooking Geneva, Switzerland.   The house is actually on the French side of the border but from its vantage point one can see Mount Blanc on one side and Lake Geneva with its Jet d’Eau on the other.  At night the sight of Geneva, lit up along the black lake, snaking its way through the Swiss mountains, is truly spectacular.  The Perrois also have apartments in Romania, where they visit the family of Jean-Luc’s wife, Delia.

As a youth, not many would have predicted such success for Jean-Luc.  He opted out of high school, working as a carpenter’s apprentice, specializing in door frames, working with wood and then aluminum and glass which would end up being one of the small factors that would direct his later career.  At some point, early in this process, Jean-Luc started classes with the Compagnons du Tour de France, an organization of craftsmen that dates back to the Middle Ages.  Even this work didn’t last.  The recession hit,  Jean-Luc had no employment and so went back to school, this time finishing his high school education and getting a vocational degree in construction.  It was here that his natural gift for mathematics and accounting came together and his work product caught the attention of professors and colleagues.

When the 1992 Olympics was announced for Albertville, France, Jean-Luc, and many others of his profession, were swept up into the process.  Perrois’ quick calculations allowed builders to anticipate the costs of construction.  He soon emerged as a top appraiser.  Others bids came in low or high, Jean-Luc’s numbers, no matter how far off they seemed at the time, always turned out to be uncannily accurate.  The proof was in the numbers.

In the post Olympic construction world of Geneva, Switzerland, Jean-Luc emerged as a nascent phenomenon in his profession.  Architects brought him their dreams of glass, aluminum, steel and marble and Jean-Luc could spit back reliable numbers for what it would all cost.  All around him men and women rose and fell in the corporate hierarchy.  Companies opened and closed and merged.  Boards of directors were elected and dismissed.   Jean-Luc remained.  He was too valuable.   Art could be debated, style could change, but who could argue with the numbers?

In 1993, Jean-Luc married Delia Sechel, a Romanian artist whose tapestries, oils and crafts appear in books and exhibitions across Europe.  They have one son, Luca Perrois.  Jean-Luc is currently working as an Associate and as the director of constructions metalliques for Revaz SA.

In the end, Jean-Luc Perrois’ gift made a place for him.  The artists could dream and create their visions on paper.  They needed him to tell them what it would cost and how it could be done.


Jim Dornan – Amway Legend – passes

August 7, 2013

Jim Dornan, arguably the most successful networker in history, passed away at 2 PM yesterday.  He had been battling cancer for months.

For more than twenty years Dornan built and ran the largest, most cohesive network of its kind in the world.  He attracted crowds of 100,000 filling soccer stadiums and auditoriums in Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia.  As an Amway distributor, product sales topped a billion dollars in multiple markets.  But it was his own “educational system” that created hundreds, if not thousands, of millionaires worldwide.

In the late 1980’s, as Amway began to go international, other networking leaders, principally, Dexter Yager and Bill Britt, shunned foreign markets, even, for a time, teaching leaders that there was no money in them.  Since most income was then made off of the sale of tapes and the running of functions, the American leaders had less leverage and control in markets where their conservative, Evangelical culture was not understood and where they could not even speak the language.

Ken Pittman, a North Carolina former American serviceman was one of the first to step into this vacuum, building a large organization in Germany in the 1970’s.  Tim Foli was even more successful, building large groups in Latin America a decade later.  But what Dornan did towered over any other entrepreneur or network marketing company.

Network 21, originally founded as an alliance of 21 Dornan “Diamonds” and soon named after the coming century, was founded in 1991.  The core of the group was formed out of an Amway organization that Dornan purchased from John and Gil Nuyten of Sydney, Australia.  The Nuyten’s were one of the fastest qualifying diamonds in Amway history.  They sold their group to Dornan and left as Christian missionaries to Israel.

I was immediately hired to speak and train for Dornan and sent to Australia to get things rolling.  I would be a speaker on the Network 21 circuit throughout the world for two decades.

More than any other figure of our generation, Jim Dornan, transformed the networking business.

1.) In an industry that was misogynist, where women were trophies, he made his wife an equal business partner.  Nancy Dornan became an outstanding spokesperson for their business.  Onstage she often stole the show from her husband.  And Jim, his ego secure in his own talents, was openly delighted by it.

The result was that women networkers were empowered worldwide and soon built legendary businesses of their own.  Beginning with Glenda Leonard and Angie Ross in Australia and then Enika Farkas of Hungary and Natasha Yena of the Ukraine.  Yena now leads one of the largest such organizations in the world.

2.) Dornan, who was trained as an engineer, recognized the need of an equitable compensation plan in his system, rather than the favoritism based on relationships that marked most other arrangements.  While he was unable to make it work in all markets and with all groups within N21, it became the goal and is now the ideal for all new systems.

3.) Dornan finally hit upon a method to take networking worldwide.  He recognized that only people with the same language and culture could find a way to relate to others of their own ethnicity.  And Dornan learned that it would take at least three couples, working together for a year, not two couples and not one.  It was a formula born out of time and error and it worked.  He saw Network 21 spread around the globe.

First it began in the ethnic communities of Sydney.   James Vaghy emerged and joined two others in taking the business to  Hungary.  Robert Angkassa, Paul and Linda Argus, S. R. Kristiawan have built huge groups in Indonesia.

When people insisted that networking educational systems would not work in Sweden, a modern socialist state, Dornan patiently subsidized the operation for two years and soon had leaders such as Matt Holmberg, speaking to audiences of 10,000.

Dornan’s European groups grew after a merger with Hans and Eva Nusshold of Vienna, Austria.  The Nusshold’s were longtime networkers who had worked with Max Schwarz.  They provided early leadership and direction.

Mitch and Deidre Sala emerged as two of the greatest Networkers in the world.

4.) Dornan, more than any other modern networker, made it socially acceptable to build such a business.  In a culture that was at times openly anti-educational and proud of it Jim Dornan was  a college graduate who offered cogent analysis on how and why networks grew or failed.  In a culture of unbuttoned shirts and garrulous gold neck chains Jim Dornan was a country club member, comfortable in a Brioni suit.  In a culture of greed, he was a major donor to charities.

Jim and Nancy Dornan’s business was inspired by a baby born with spina bifada.  The Dornan’s were educated, Purdue University graduates, with successful incomes.  But here was a crisis that only money, big money could solve.  They knew the challenges and struggles of network marketing but it had one feature that Jim’s lucrative engineering career could not match.  It had no ceiling on the income they could generate. If they were to give their baby a chance at life, they would need more than insurance or even a lucrative engineering income could supply.

Jim Dornan has many achievements.  He co-authored a book on leadership with John Maxwell.  He was a great philanthropist.  Network 21 is the largest corporate donor to World Vision and other charities.  When we hosted a Charity Awards event, the Dornans were always front and center.  When I worked in the White House I brought Jim Dornan into the Oval Office to meet with the president.

But in the final analysis, his greatest achievement may have been that as a husband and a father.  He and his wife, Nancy, have three children, Eric, Heather and David.   Jim and Nancy built the world’s largest network, inspired by their love of a baby, born with a handicap, but fighting for its life.  That was long ago.  And from that love came hundreds of new millionaires and thousands of dreams come true.  That little baby survived its early battles for life and grew into manhood, helping others with his same handicap find hope for themselves and their futures. He will be there to mourn his father, the networking legend, when he is lowered into the earth this week.

(Note: For some corrections and added details please read the comments of David Steadman below.)


									

How Phil Gerlicher is Changing The Face Of Insurance

June 12, 2013
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Phil Gerlicher, president of FFS

There is a lot of attention focused on First Financial Security.  You seem to have turned things around.  What has been the difference?

The fact that we are still here has a lot of people talking.  I was told by one of the large recruiters in our industry that he and many others were standing on the sidelines waiting for FFS to fail.  We were given virtually no chance of succeeding simply because we were a company run by outsiders, and our leaders were yesterday’s bench-burners.

I’ve learned over the years that business is a full contact sport and like boxing (or MMA in today’s vernacular) it’s about the last man standing.  People tend to forget that everything and everybody has a life cycle.  We are a determined bunch here at First Financial Security and it appears that, quite simply, it is now our turn and many who were on the sidelines are now taking a serious look at our value proposition.

Why did you buy this company?  What drew you into First Financial Security?

Lack of information, I guess (just kidding).   Seriously though, had I known what we were in for, I most likely would have taken a pass on the whole thing, even knowing the powerful potential of the business model.

Business opportunities to business men and women are like waves to surfers.  If you miss one you just have to wait for the next one.  I have always tried to conduct myself in a way that would position me for that next opportunity “wave”.

In this case, I was contacted by someone who thought I could help them out of a problem and that’s how I became involved.  I had been familiar with the business model for almost 10 years and had been intrigued by the spectacular successes of similar companies in an industry that prides itself on controlled and predictable growth.  One of the serious challenges that the insurance industry faces is recruiting new people into the business.  It’s a tough sell, unless you have an exciting and innovative value proposition and marketing system, which FFS has.

Anyway, I was given the opportunity to examine the business model from the inside, P & L’s, pro forma, that sort of thing and I guess I was drawn in at that point.  After working with our incredible field leaders and internal staff, I’m hooked.

What has been some of your other business ventures and experiences?

Right out of college I went to work for the auditing division of a mid-size bank holding company.  It became clear early on that to get anywhere in the corporate world, someone above you had to die or leave or you had to leave and go to a different department.   So I transferred to the Investment Division of the bank to get my promotion and spent time learning the bond markets.  While I enjoyed my jobs I found the corporate environment rather restrictive for anyone with ambition.

My father-in-law convinced me that owning my own business was the only way to build and accumulate long term wealth and it was best to try it while I was still young.  We bought a small manufacturing business and ran it for four years until we had lost what little we had.  But the lessons learned about people, integrity, perseverance, the IRS and business in general prepared us for what we are doing today.

From there I took a job selling life insurance to the customers of a small Savings & Loan and from then on I have been in the insurance industry in one form or another.

What do you find different about networking?

In the context of insurance and financial services, there really is not much of a difference between “traditional marketing” and “networking marketing”.  In fact, and in both worlds, there is a strong positive correlation between one’s level of success and one’s ability to network.  The first thing my sales manager told me to do with my first sales position is to write down the names of everyone I knew.  It clicked with me right away.  You naturally begin networking with those you know – your warm market!  That’s networking and that’s FFS.

How is the networking experience different from what you thought it would be?

Prior to my involvement with First Financial Security, my opinions about the networking business were formed by my limited observations of other people and their experiences in non-financial services MLM opportunities such as direct selling or party plans.  While the networking “experience” here at FFS is different due to the regulatory environment of our industry, everything good about the networking industry – the energy, the people, the enthusiasm, the values – was consistent with my expectations.  And I love it.  It’s deliciously contagious!

How do you react to the recent criticism about networking, and the public attacks on some companies, were stocks were sold short?

My reaction is this, it goes with the territory.  While going public has its’ advantages, the transparency and reporting requirements that come with being a publically traded company open you up to short selling and all of the media and propaganda that goes with it.  While most of the time the criticisms are unfair and overblown, I think overall it’s healthy for any industry to be open to legitimate scrutiny and criticism.

Bear in mind that the shorts don’t always win.  The current high profile grudge match between Ackman and Icahn over Herbalife is great theater but has little impact on the fundamentals of the company.  I’m in the camp that believes that eventually, the market is always right.  Free markets are a wonderful thing.  I voluntarily sell a company stock short because I think it is going down and I voluntarily go long on the stock because I think it is going up.

The big story here is that your sales team was demoralized and now it has taken a 180 degree turn.  How did you win the trust of the First Financial Security sales team?  How did you motivate them?

Trust is earned.  And in our particular case, most of our leaders had been disappointed in the leadership of prior companies.   We simply needed to do what we said we were going to do. Sometimes it was hard and it took longer than anyone thought.  Early on we were fortunate enough to have a few early “converts” that took the good news of the FFS opportunity and spread it around completely on faith.

As for motivation, this model attracts people that are already highly motivated and are looking for the right opportunity to channel that energy.  Compared to the other options out there, the FFS value proposition is pretty strong and the fact that we have delivered on the “Equity Share” promise seems to keep everyone energized and focused.  Oh, and did I mention that our annual Dream Destination trips are some of the best in the industry?  Our people fight for those.

How does networking fit in this new hyper government run economy?  Is the old free enterprise concept outdated?  Will business of the future be joint ventures with the government?

First Financial Security gives everyone who wants it the opportunity to participate in the American Dream of owning your own business.  Since ours is and has been a highly regulated industry, the recent round on government intrusion has had little impact on our business.  Networking is good for people, for business and for the country.  You simply cannot have a viable free economy where everyone works for the government in one fashion or another.  I reject the idea that the US economic system is headed for a future of joint ventures with our government, like China for example.  I believe that it is an inevitability that China will continue to migrate to more of a free market like ours.  As the Chinese people increasingly are exposed to free market principles via the internet, the call for market and government reform will only get louder.  I mean, how do you deal with a billion ticked off peasants?


Bill Britt: Amway Legend

January 27, 2013
     Bill Britt, one of the most successful MLM businessmen in history and the man who built one of the world’s largest direct sales networks, died this week of heart failure.  He was 81 years old.  There will be a funeral service held in LaGrange, North Carolina and a memorial service next week in Raleigh.
 
 
     Britt was famous as a straight shooter, unabashed and uncompromising in his views.  While most entrepreneurs would advise against mixing the subjects of religion or politics with business, those were always the central themes of any of his speeches.  Britt’s strong patriotism and conservative political views were stated clearly – before crowds of thousands – without hesitation.  And his Christian faith was declared loudly and without apology.  If Margaret Thatcher was the “Iron Lady,” to her generation, Bill Britt was surely the “Iron Man” within the world of network marketing.
 
 
     The North Carolina businessman was seldom thought of as separate from his wife, Peggy.  It was always “Bill and Peggy Britt,” even though Peggy was a quiet, soft spoken, a contrast to her husband’s more bombastic personality.  Peggy could often be seen at large conventions, looking on adoringly as Bill gave speeches, like a Nancy Reagan, supporting her man.  And like Mrs. Reagan, Peggy was known to be alert to those who would take advantage of her husband.
 
 
     Likewise, when Bill Britt’s name was mentioned it was often in the same sentence with Dexter Yager, Bill’s upline networking colleague.  Bill made a career out of demonstrating public loyalty to Dexter.  It was surely part of the secret to his success at keeping together such a large, cohesive network organization, for such a long time.
 
 
     On Bill’s 80th birthday, at a gathering of several hundred networking leaders, Bill Britt brought back Dexter Yager to honor him and tell his leaders that “this is the man who changed my life.”
 
 
     Britt was a city manager in North Carolina when he was first shown the networking business by Dominick Coniguilaro, a downline friend and distributor of Dexter Yager.  As the Yager network expanded across North America, Bill Britt’s organization followed a close second.
 
 
     A major turning point in the history of networking took place when Yager and Britt were confronted by a young man with a big idea.  Richard Clark suggested that they build their own cassette tape manufacturing plant.  As networkers they already had a customer base that would justify the investment and if the plant were big enough they could make a fortune when massive orders for a hit song or a political candidate suddenly demanded it.
 
 
     According to the story widely accepted on the street, Yager declined the Clark suggestion and Britt said, “Yes.”  It was a decision that would soon make Britt and network marketers worldwide extremely rich.  Within a few years Britt’s company would be one of the major suppliers of cassettes in North America.  For a time, the Amway Corporation and Dexter Yager, himself, would buy their tapes from Bill Britt’s manufacturing concern.
 
 
     Britt was late to the international networking game.  He invested large amounts of money and fielded a superb staff but the formula of God and Country that worked so well in North America fell flat in other markets.  Not only did he fall behind Jim and Nancy Dornan who built Network 21, the largest worldwide network, but for a while he fell behind his upline, Dexter Yager, as well.
 
 
     Britt found his comeback in Kanti and Lata Gala, business persons from India.  They went on to build a huge business worldwide.  Arguably, the largest surviving remnants of the Britt organization in North America are led by Ron Puryear in the Pacific Northwest and Larry and Pam Winters in North Carolina.   Other domestic leaders include Angelo and Claudia Nardone and Paul and Leslie Miller.
 
 
     Joel Griffing says that Bill Britt came from a troubled home.  His father was an alcoholic.  In a rare moment, when asked when and how his life changed he offered a story that was seldom told onstage.  He was an enlisted soldier in Korea, he said, when another soldier came along and said “Bill, you’re officer material.”  According to Britt, that small exchange turned his life around.  He went to officer candidate school, found his faith in God, and gained the confidence to pursue his destiny.
 
 
     Bill Britt was not perfect.  In today’s world he would be labeled a homophobe and a misogynist.  It is the latter that sometimes hurt his image with fellow networkers.  One couple remembers him returning late at night from a large meal, including desert, and then ordering his wife to go to the kitchen to prepare banana pudding.  She obeyed.  Another remembers him suddenly, unexpectedly ordering his wife to step into the aisle of a restaurant and dance.  Again, she obeyed.
 
 
     As a city manager in Sanford and then Goldsboro he had his ups and downs.  And as a business investor he made some pretty big mistakes as well as some outstanding successes.  It was network marketing that worked for him and provided the steady stream of income to play with.
 
 
     Bill organized his leaders into an association that formed committees and created systems that allowed them to avoid many of the lawsuits and crisis that would come to other groups.
 
 
     If Bill was a showman onstage he always kept one foot out of the business as well.  He understood the reality outside the ballroom and the coliseum.  In 1989 I was working in the White House and arranged for him to come in to meet with the president in a Roosevelt Room meeting with twenty other leaders.  Britt wisely stripped the showy diamond rings off his fingers and blended in nicely.
 
 
     When it became apparent that they would not have children of their own, Peggy Britt wanted to adopt.  But Bill thought it was too late.   And so, his friends in network marketing became those children.  And they will be the ones who descend on the tiny little town of LaGrange next week to say goodbye to a legend.
 
 
 
     On short notice I couldn’t get to many of Bill’s friends and I am sorry for that.  Their comments and eulogies will follow in the days to come.  But here are a few loving thoughts from those I have been able to reach today.  Also see MLM Hall of Fame.
 
 
     John Crowe:  “Very few people have had an impact on me as deeply as he has.  He reinforced things I was brought up with.  Love of country.  He confronted me spiritually.  He was in your face.  Every one of us needs that sometime.
 
 
     Tim Goad: “People don’t realize that he loved to sing.  About a year ago we stopped by his place just to thank him for how he had influenced our lived and we ended up signing old hymns and songs and he sang too.”
 
 
     Bill Childers: “He was the star when we got in.  He was the one with the biggest organization under Yager.  He had John Crowe and Paul MIller and we were all were chasing them.
 
 
     Rex Renfro:  “He was very caring and tender hearted.  He could be tough but he could also cry.  I saw him go the extra mile, helping people, encouraging people. I have what I have today because of him.  He was strong.  When he believed in something he didn’t care who thought different.
 
 

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