Will Hillary’ granddaughter be a game changer?

September 29, 2014

Will Hillary Clinton’s new granddaughter be a political plus or minus? Will she make us feel kinder toward Hillary, a sometimes choleric personality, or will she remind us that the Clinton’s have been around too long and are corrupted by the process?  Or does it really matter?

Here’s my historical rule of thumb.  Grandkids are usually bad for male leaders and good for female leaders.  The American electorate, anyway, clearly likes their men young and vigorous like John  F. Kennedy and Theodore Roosevelt.   And worldwide, older women have been more successful in politics than younger women.  Maggie Thatcher comes to mind.  So too does Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir, who was revered for her wisdom.   She was actually called “the grandmother of the Jewish nation.”

John F. Kennedy was portrayed as youthful and “vigorous,” his failing health hidden from view.  FDR’s polio was carefully shielded by an adoring press who traded access to the boss for serving as his personal public relations team.

When Ronald Reagan’s grandchildren were photographed with the president building a snowman in the Rose Garden, Reagan’s media savvy staffer, Michael Deaver, had a fit.  The grandchildren were never to be seen.  Even the children were kept at bay, when possible.  The Reagan children, products of different marriages were a reminder that the president had been divorced and the grandchildren were reminders that he was old.  Even today, while most Americans can name the Reagan children, not very many can name the grandchildren who were kept from view.

In fact, many recent presidents were grandfathers with grandchildren roaming the halls of the White House.  George H.W. Bush, Jimmy Carter, Dwight Eisenhower and FDR all had grandchildren living, at various times, in the White House.

Eisenhower’s grandson, David, lived in the White House with his mother and father, John and Barbara Eisenhower.  The latter, the president’s daughter in law, served as Eisenhower’s hostess on road trips in place of the First Lady.  Mamie Eisenhower had a fear of flying.

Meanwhile, in the Eisenhower White House, grandson David played with the Vice President’s daughter, Julie Nixon.  Years later they were married on the eve of the Nixon presidency, thus at least one president’s grandchild helped elect an American president.

The very first president, George Washington, married the widow, Martha Custis and when her children died, they raised the grandchildren as their own.  George and Martha lived with them in the president’s mansion while George served as the nation’s head of state.

America’s love affair with young, vigorous presidents may be a reaction to our European, monarchial roots.   European cultures have sometimes revered their aging political leaders as if they were Kings or Queen s.  French President Charles de Gaulle served until age 79.  British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill was finally voted out of power at age 81. Otto von Bismarck served as German Chancellor until age 75.  German leader, Paul Hindenburg, served as president until age 86 and in more recent years, Conrad Adenauer served until age 87.

Young female leaders have a more challenging time.  When a younger, First Lady, Hillary Clinton tried to organize the White House push for healthcare, critics said she came off as pushy and presumptuous.  When Republican presidential candidate, Michelle Bachman, an Evangelical Christian, won the Ames, Iowa Cavalcade Straw Poll in 2011 and had a clear path to winning the Iowa Caucus, Southern Baptists leaders rejected the idea of a women candidate and pushed for Texas Governor Rick Perry, also an evangelical Christian, to get into the race.  It was a disaster.  Both candidates failed.

When GOP nominee, John McCain picked Alaska governor, Sarah Palin as his running mate, critics labeled her screechy and shallow.  Her biggest critics were other women.

The gold standard for modern women political leaders is the late, former, Prime Minister of Great Britain, Margaret Thatcher.  The story is that she was given voice lessons to help her lower her voice from a shrill housewife to the calm, sagacious leader that is known to history.

Likewise, one can see the changes in Hillary Clinton’s demeanor.  She has morphed from what critics described as the mean-spirited, know-it-all supervisor of the driver’s license bureau into a more wise and caring leader.  It is very likely that a granddaughter will only speed up that transformation.  If Hillary Clinton is elected president and her political advisers trump the Clinton family penchant for personal privacy, Charlotte Clinton Mezvinsky, born September 26, 2014, to Marc and Chelsea Mezvinsky, may just be the most visible presidential grandchild we have seen in a long time.


LPAC 2014 has stellar lineup – starts tomorrow

September 18, 2014
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The Liberty Political Action Committee has helped changed the views of the country and is helping to shape our future.  Join us starting tomorrow and hear Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Justin Amash and the father of the Liberty Movement, Ron Paul.  Oh yes, Doug Wead will be speaking too.  Ha. ha.  My kids say, “Dad, you’re the only one I’ve never hear of.”
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John Tate and a marvelous, hardworking team of many others have helped build this organization.  Their convention is spectacular.
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Hashtag on Twitter will be #LPAC2014.
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Here’s a link to the speaker page: http://lpac.com/speakers/
Ticket purchase: https://lpac.com/tickets/
And LPAC in general:  http://lpac.com/
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Doug Wead speaking at LPAC last year:


Romney Redux

September 11, 2014

Will former Massachusetts governor, Mitt Romney, run for president again?  And if he does could he win?  Has it happened before?

Mitt Romney has allowed his friends to test the waters for another presidential run and with good reason.

1.) Obama is fading fast.  He might as well have a sign on his desk, “The Buck Doesn’t Stop Here.”

2.) Romney knows what to do.  He has already run for president twice.

3.) He co-opted the GOP caucus-primary system last time, making it Romney friendly.

4.) Just in case, he also strong-armed the last Republican National Convention and re-wrote the rules in his favor so he can actually lose in some key primaries and still overwhelm the vote and control the floor at the RNC.  All he will need is a simple majority.

Has it happened before?  Can a candidate run for president and lose and come back to win later?

Answer?  Most presidents do.  Barack Obama being the anomaly.  In recent years, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, Ronald Reagan, Richard Nixon, Lyndon Johnson, all ran for president and lost before finally winning.

But has a presidential candidate actually won the nomination, ran for president, lost, and then comeback?

Yep.  Three come to mind.  William Henry Harrison ran as a Whig nominee in 1836.  He lost but came back to win in 1840 and went on to the White House.

Grover Cleveland was elected president in 1884, lost his re-election bid but came back to win again in 1892.

And finally, Richard Nixon won the GOP nomination in 1960, losing to John F. Kennedy in the general election.  He came back in 1968 to try again and this time won the presidency.

But all three of these examples are very complicated.  Nixon, for example, after losing the presidency, ran for governor of California where he was defeated again.  That defeat seemed to end his public career.  In 1964 the GOP experienced its conservative takeover and Barry Goldwater won the nomination.  Many GOP leaders sat at home.  Nixon jumped into the 1964 election and helped Republican candidates, seeking nothing for himself.  With his own career apparently over, he was seen as a non threatening, beloved figure and a great fundraiser.  By 1968, the GOP wanted a winner and it united behind Nixon.

Romney is reminiscent of Thomas Dewey.  He looks like a president, the few Republicans who are part of the media elite think he ought to be president but he won’t even cross the street to shake hands with the people who can make it happen.  Romney recently described how he would run again.  If the other candidates all came to him and said, “We just can’t do it we need you.”  Fat chance.

In 2012 Romney, a Mormon, was urged to meet with Evangelical Christian leaders.  Didn’t happen.  No time.  Gallup Polls show that 41% of the American public claim to be born again Christians. and they are the base of the Republican Party.  Romney took comfort from his Boston-Washington cronies and ignored them.  He publicly laughed at the emerging Libertarian wing of the GOP and shut down their efforts to participate in state conventions.  Nor did Catholics fair any better.  He had plain clothes security guards surround Hispanics on the floor of the RNC and rush them out of the building because they held up signs of other candidates.

Polls don’t mean a lot this early.  Some of it is only name recognition.  Romney was the last GOP nominee.  Voters were forced to choose between he and Obama in the last election.  Of much more significance is the recent Zogby poll which had Rand Paul running away with the GOP nomination, rather startling for an outsider, this early.  And polls showing Rand Paul as the only GOP candidate beating Hillary Clinton in battleground states.  But polls, even this early, can translate into money.  Which brings up the point that Romney, unlike most of the other candidates, has money.

So if Mitt Romney runs again what are his chances?  If he runs the same kind of exclusive, white, Mormon, campaign, don’t be surprised if he gets the same kind of result.  Winning campaigns like Obama, Clinton, Reagan, give the masses a sense of ownership.  People feel a part of what has happened.  They feel needed and included, not shutout or ridiculed.  Reagan appealed to White Mormon men in the Mountain states, Southern born again Christians in North Carolina, Catholic, Democrat, union factory workers in Detroit, Michigan and highly educated Jews in Shaker Heights, Ohio.  But he worked those constituencies humbly and earnestly.  I remember sitting with Reagan in a waiting room, anticipating a meeting with a pompous evangelical leader.  I have done the same with George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush.

Can he win?  History shows that it can happen.  But it also shows that it will be difficult.

 


Why was James Foley left to die?

August 22, 2014

Gretchen Carlson is one of the best of the Fox News anchors and she just nailed it with her comment about the gruesome  murder of James Foley by ISIS thugs.  She quoted a State Department spokesman, who explained why we had not negotiated for the release of the journalist. “The United States does not negotiate with terrorists.”

“But isn’t that exactly what we did for Bowe Burgdahl?”  Carlson asked.  Burgdahl was the Islamic sympathizer whose parents were feted at the White House by President Barack Obama when his release was announced.

An article in The Hill says the Pentagon clearly broke the law in the Burgdahl case.  The Associated Press just ran a story on the hypocrisy of the difference between the two hostages.

What many will miss is the deep faith of James Foley and how that factored into this story and American policy.

Keep in mind, ISIS is confronting Christians in Iraq with the following option: convert to Islam or die.  And Christians are being executed in other Islamic countries for no other reason than their faith.

Before Barack Obama, every recent president since Reagan has been active worldwide in helping persecuted and martyred Christians.  When I worked in the White House of George H.W. Bush we regularly helped get Christians out of prisons all over Africa and Asia.  These included missionaries and educators but also journalists and relief workers.  Bill Clinton helped establish the International Religious Freedom Act that worked with the United Nations to stop the slaughter.  Unfortunately what we saw happen to James Foley is only a small vignette of killings of Christians worldwide.  Senator Rand Paul has called for withholding foreign aid to nations who execute Christians just because of their faith.  But he has had only two co-sponsors.  And the Obama administration quickly quashed the idea.

The national media, who once winked at communism, hoping to avoid getting on their killing lists when they took over America, now seem to be courting the Islamic extremists.  Leave us alone.  Don’t hurt us or our families when we travel the world and we will not hurt you.  Here, take our Christians.  For years the media blurred the distinctions between Muslims and Christians in wars in Africa leaving most Americans ignorant of how religion was actually driving the crisis.

On all of these issues moderate Muslims are silent.

Meanwhile, being a Christian and being open about it can get you killed in the Islamic world, and left to die by a politically correct American government who will not ransom you.  James Foley, whose Christian faith was no secret, once described to an audience at Marquette how prayer kept him alive during his captivity by Muammar Gaddafi.

As it turned out surviving Barack Obama’s foreign policy takes more than prayer.

 


When presidents go on vacation

August 16, 2014

Having written about presidents and worked for presidents I can tell you that there are some misconceptions about presidential vacations.  Some things happen like the rest of us.  Some things don’t.

First there is the idea that the president is the boss and can take off when he wants.  Actually, he is at the mercy of other people just as we all are.  For example, he must co-ordinate with the legislative calendar on Capitol Hill.  If he is not in Washington to help lobby his own bills in congress both his legislation and his presidency will suffer.

Likewise, the timing and planning behind visits from foreign Heads of State are calculated well in advance.  If the president cancels a visit in favor of a sudden vacation with the kids to Disney World he can ruin a relationship or trigger an international crisis.  And if the president insists on taking a scheduled vacation when the rest of the world is falling apart he risks a political uproar.

In 1983, when the Soviets shot down a civilian Korean Airlines, Reagan cut short his time at the ranch in California and flew back to the Oval Office to address the nation.

Some people get upset if the president isn’t in the Oval Office with his sleeves rolled up.  But actually the work of a president is making decisions and that process does not stop, not for Eisenhower on the Golf Course, Kennedy at the beach, or Obama on a bicycle.

Woodrow Wilson, who had been the president of Princeton University, and brought an academic mindset to Oval Office decision making, was scandalized by the pace.  He told his wife and daughters that he didn’t have time to think, that he couldn’t even take a walk before making a decision.

The Oval Office was only built in 1909, which means that most presidents never worked there at all.  And today’s West Wing Oval Office was built in 1934 by President Franklin Roosevelt.  Many presidents, such as Richard Nixon, only used it for ceremonial purposes.  He did his real work in a more expansive office in the Old Executive Office Building which is adjacent to the White House mansion.

Some presidents, like George W. Bush, were not paper shufflers.  They got much of their work done through conversations and that could take place anywhere. The staff had to turn it all into paper. When presidents travel their communications network travels with them, as well as a miniature White House staff.

You will hear a lot of people talk about how Air Force One has ushered in a new era of the traveling president.  Not really. American presidents began extensive travel with trains.  At their peak presidential trains crisscrossed the continent and were a virtual traveling White House.  At one time each cabinet member had his own available train.

Presidents have always been criticized for taking time off, beginning with George Washington who often visited Mt. Vernon.  President Obama recently took a lot of hits for taking a vacation in the midst of world crisis but former presidents of both political parties won’t criticize one of their own for getting some rest. “I don’t agree with your politics,” Richard Nixon said to John F. Kennedy, after the latter won the 1960 election, “But I will never criticize you for taking a vacation.”

Perhaps the biggest misconception about presidents is how well informed they are, and how their morning intelligence briefing keeps them in the loop, even while on vacation.

It depends on the president, of course, but almost all of them become isolated in office.  It is the nature of power.  A memo sent to the president is stamped “The President Has Seen” and becomes an official document of government that will one day be seen by the world.  And so staffers who once told their boss everything are reluctant to send information that others will one day see and judge out of context.

While it’s true that because of their security briefings presidents have information that the rest of us don’t have, even on vacation, the fact is that we sometimes have information that they don’t have!  It is a story as old as the Emperor’s Clothes and it is strikingly seen in George W. Bush’s slow response to Hurricane Katrina and the unfolding tragedy in New Orleans. While the whole nation watched as mothers and children were trapped in 90 degree heat on rooftops without water, food or toilets, and an obvious major health crisis was in the making, the president was at his ranch and not to be disturbed. It was a costly mistake.

Having worked on senior staff at the White House I was often astounded and surprised at what the president knew and what he didn’t know.  There just isn’t time for anyone to know everything.


Forge of Empires: Best strategy game for iPad

August 3, 2014

At last there is a strategy game for iPad.  Forge of Empires.  Nothing else I’ve tried really compares.  And like everything else on iPad it has forced me into a wider community and to my surprise I like it.

Since Christmas, 1992, when my son first tempted me to make a move in Sid Mier’s Civilization, I have been a rabid fan of computer strategy games.  And I have enjoyed all of the variations since.  Some of today’s mods are just amazing and make it an entirely different game.

Once, in between speaking engagements in Asia, I was sent to the South Pacific island resort of Bali.  The company put me in a five star hotel-resort.  When I opened my sliding doors, cool winds blew in off the ocean.  I spent the week taking food in my room and battling the demons in the computer.  Who needs a beach when you have the whole world to conquer?

But try as it may, Sid Mier’s Civilization has not yet made the transition to iPad that I want.  And I grow tired dragging around a heavy computer.

Forge of Empires was a perfect fit for iPad.  The basics of the game are simple enough to work and yet the options are endless.  The first few weeks I was totally on iPad and only reluctantly checked out the extra features by going online with my desktop.

The best part is that you can play a game and be part of the family.  I am no longer in “the computer room.”  I can be right there on the couch watching a movie or at Panera Bread or Starbucks, while managing my growing empire.  And how can the family complain if they are checking their Facebook or pictures on Instagram?

Now don’t just rush to your iPad and download the app.  Go to your desktop and put in the url below.  Just cut and paste.  Or go to this link. It will sign you up as my friend and I will be able to give you some supplies or even coach you if you need or want it.  For this is a game where allies can be of help.

http://us.forgeofempires.com/?invitor_id=1898927&world_id=us2&ref=player_invite_link

There is war, there is economy, there is city building and long range planning.  And it can all be carried around with your iPad.

Nice.


Israel – Hamas and the Holocaust Revisited

July 29, 2014

“Israel defends its children with rockets.  Hamas defends its rockets with children.”  – Benjamin Netanyahu

After writing about the recent crisis between Israel and Hamas my post has been receiving comments by persons with revisionist views on the Holocaust.  Rather than answer each one I  thought I would write a separate post to make my own views clear.

Like most people, I share the terrible sorrow over the scenes of dying children in Gaza.  And yet I cannot sanction the continuous , indiscriminate firing of rockets into populated areas of Israel either.  The idea that the death rate is  disproportionate is not much of a moral argument to me.  An enemy in battle has no obligation to equalize the death rate for his opponents.  If a Hamas rocket landed in a crowded street of Tel Aviv would they decrease their rate of fire?

Yes, I hate the sight of dying children.  It is heartbreaking.  So I wonder why has the Hamas – influenced government refused to accept an unconditional cease-fire which would stop that killing?   And why are they openly saying that their latest attack is in retaliation for the Egyptian blockade of their border?  Why are they not sending rockets into Egypt?  And if Egypt, an Islamic nation, who has been persecuting Coptic Christians, is threatened by the Palestinian-Hamas government in Gaza and sees them as terrorists, why are we giving that government U.S. foreign aid?

The idea of some persons commenting on my blogs appears to be that the deaths of children in Gaza is evidence that the Jews are basically bad people.  That even the Holocaust has been invented and/ or distorted for propaganda purposes.

My belief is that the deaths of these children in Gaza are very real consequences to a terrible war gone bad.  But that the deaths during the Holocaust were also very real and the memory of those who suffered at the hands of a corrupt and evil government program is sacred.  The Jews, as a people, cannot be seen outside of this context.

I do not come to my views of the Holocaust casually.  As a youth I read the standard World War II books, mostly written by English and American writers, but this led to books by generals and participants on both sides of the conflict.  By the time Albert Speer’s books were published I had read deeply on the subject including transcripts of Hitler’s table talk, the Goebbels’ diaries and all the personal accounts of secretaries, valets, around the principal figures. And of course I read hundreds of the biographies and autobiographies of that era.

The Nuremberg Trial was fascinating.  I read all of the English versions of books by concentration camp survivors.  And, even now, as new ones are translated and appear, I find them and read them as well.   Very early I devoured all of the carefully researched David Irving books and later the Holocaust revisionist spin offs that followed.  I read excerpts from the Irving trial and the tedious studies of Robert Jan van Pelt.

In my travels I visited battlefields including Kursk, St. Petersburg, Volgograd (Stalingrad).  I visited Auschwitz-Birkenau, Sachsenhausen, Dachau, Buchenwald and some smaller concentration camps in Belgium and France.  In some cases I made return visits, stepping off the cement foundations of the gas chambers to calculate if it were mathematically possible for so many to be shuffled in and out.

In Russia, Belarus and the Ukraine I stopped by the road and visited markers depicting the historical sites of various atrocities.   With the collapse of the Soviet Union came the release of a whole new round of information giving insights and corrections to events.

Yes, there are mistakes in print everywhere.  Just as there are in any other history, including presidential history, which I research as a career. But the Holocaust indeed happened and has been carefully chronicled in spite of Nazi efforts to keep it hidden.  Martin Gilbert’s book, Holocaust, may be the most complete accounting and it can be mind numbing.  Gilbert tracks it all, country by country, city by city, block by block and family by family.  The predictable stories repeat over and over with the denial, right up to the end, until the door is shut behind.

I stubbornly read the stories of survivors because I know that the perpetrators wanted these people to die alone, unknown to the world.  And the victims felt abandoned, so I want to be there with them, along with thousands of other readers, whispering between the pages, “I am here too, with you, we all now know what happened, you are not alone, you are not forgotten and I weep with you over the inhumanity of your captors.”

It would be a mistake for us to turn away from the faces of the dying children in Gaza.  But it is also a shame for us to pretend that the Holocaust didn’t happen.

 


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